The Photographs, the Film and the Spherical Ball

One of the young people's photographs in the exhibition

One of the young people's photographs in the exhibition

The visitor centre will host the exhibition until the 13th of May

The visitor centre will host the exhibition until the 13th of May

Once I read that according to Marie Dacke of Lund University, Sweden, the Scarabeus Sacer (Dung Beetle) uses the Milky Way to align itself in order to navigate on top of a spherical dung ball and so to establish an escape route from rivals.

The cosmological encounter with other tiny creatures, the bees, that happened last summer during our Bees for a Better World project, symbolised and still represents an educational opportunity not only for our young people and for all of us at Global Generation but, hopefully, for all the people who attended its final stage on 5 April in occasion of the launch of the photography exhibition at the King’s Cross Visitor Centre and the projection of the film Dear Nature in the Skip Garden.

The evening of the launch on the 5 of April

The evening of the launch on the 5 of April

The photographs and the writing that spread Global Generation’s spirit symbolise Nature’s invitation to consider what we can use as our daily guide, what can potentially create a point of reference around something that is far away from our ego- and anthropocentric being and closer to our cosmological being.

The photographs, the writing and the voices of our young people help us reconnect with the Universe and with a different understanding of life. This is what I feel every time I work with Generators and this is what I had to listen to during the installation of the exhibition and the making of the film, time during which it was difficult to decide, as an educator, what could be the best way to translate what the young people told us through their participation at the summer school, especially because the summer project happened while I was on maternity leave.

It was a bit like being a Scarabeus Sacer on the top of a spherical ball.

My colleagues Heather Kelly, Dave Eland and Alex Carulli were part of this process as well. But once we aligned our little world of daily life with the immensities, it seemed easy to find the right way to visually translate the young people’s experiences.

Installing the exhibition with Heather and Dave

Installing the exhibition with Heather and Dave

Like everything we do at the Skip Garden, new Generators also infused us with more energy helping out in making parts of the exhibition and hosting the launch with drinks and food.

Addie, one of our young women Generators working on the honey comb display

Addie, one of our young women Generators working on the honey comb display

Adrianna and Samika making the exhibition frames with our generators

Adrianna and Samika making the exhibition frames with our generators

During the evening, one of the Bees for a Better World ambassador Akshata Mishra was proclaimed winner of the Bug Hotel Competition by Eurostar, and her beautiful design will be made into a real structure this summer at the Eurostar headquarters.

I suppose these words are my invitation to visit the young people’s photography exhibition and to watch our new film Dear Nature.  

A young person’s view of the world and a bee’s view of the cosmos might inspire or help you too one day.

Akshata recieving her award

Akshata recieving her award